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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN 17
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English 17
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> coming up next, senator from connecticut talk about the shooting in newtown, conn.. on [video clip] that comes journal" up at 7:00. a senate panel looks at credit reports in consumers access in home loans and other consumer products. that is live at 10:00 a.m. eastern on cspan 3. the secretary of state william byrnes will testify this week about the september 11 attacks on the u.s. mission in benghazi, libya. that is live thursday at 1:00 p.m. eastern on cspan 3. the two connecticut u.s. senators talked about last week's school shootings in newtown, conn.. this is 40 minutes. >> mr. president, we appear to be in one of those periods of time where we are working too often through the valley of the shadow of death. senator blumenthal and i've come to the floor to speak about the tragedy that occurred, the senseless horrific attacks on innocent people in newtown, conn.. last friday. we must also note with extraordinary respect and sense of loss the death of our truly beloved colleague, senator dan inouye of hawaii. america, as senat
and improvements in the bridges in connecticut to make this in new and system to attract the ridership we need to make those cost savings and that calculation work. >> i guess i'm referring to the fact that the $4 billion in revenue projected, that's just one number, one benefit, one source. it's far from what we should be talking about and everybody knows that. but the more you can give us, the different angles you might take, i'm sure it's all going to be helpful. >> and we will do that with amtrak and our partners at u surks dot. >> any further questions from any members of the committee? >> i'd like to thank each of our witnesses today. today's hearing will remain open and unanimous consent that the record remain open for 15 days for questions submitted by members of today east hearing. i'd like to thank our witnesses for your testimony today and appreciate you working with our legislative calendar today. if no members have anything to add, the committee >> in new town, connecticut this morning, 27 people have been shot dead according to a report by the associated press. one of the gunman
there in connecticut. if we do not stand together, we ought to throw it out the window and protect american citizens. if we cannot do that, we have failed as an american people. host: what kind of gun do you own? caller: i have a shotgun, a rifle, and a pistol. i used to keep them in the house. i don't have them in the house no more. to me, you know, and i love hunting, but assault weapons -- it just has no business. host: have you ever been a member of the nra? caller: no, never been a member of the nra. host: from our facebook page, jess says -- jeff says -- nicholas, what kind of gun do you have? caller: i have two fire armas, an ak-47, and an ar-15 bought as recently as yesterday. host: why did you buy one yesterday? caller: i have wanted one for some time but just didn't. in anticipation of a ban, i made the decision to go out and purchase one. that being said, i want to say i am in favor of huge increases in gun-control law. i think one of the things that is most disturbing to me is to hear fear mongering on both sides of the conversation whether it is coming from anti- gun or pro-gun individu
york and new jersey, as well as connecticut and other places along the eastern seaboard. we are working to conduct damage assessments for both operating capital costs needed to rebuild and restore. early efforts should allow us to compensate transit agencies promptly once assistance is made available by congress. this is a first-time effort to get fda contractors and fema people working side by side to do cost evaluation quickly and in concert with one another. secondly, the administration is requesting $5.5 billion to make transit agencies more resilient. people cannot afford to endure the loss of life and property that occurs when catastrophic events repeat themselves over and over. the sums to save them can far outweigh the cost to repair them multiple times. indeed, regional cooperation will be critical to this effort. president obama, as you know this month established a hurricane sandy rebuilding task force under the leadership of hud secretary donovan. we went up to new york just last week to sit with the head of new jersey transit as well as the port authority to make sure that
applebaum. later, the service earlier tonight in newtown, connecticut . the expression -- he coined the expression iron curtain. it was such an evocative description of what happened when he gave the speech that i thought it was important to put that the beginning of the book. >> did you ever think of what he called that the iron curtain? >> there is a long story. it is a theatrical term. there was an iron curtain theaters used to use to prevent fires. churchill used it first in private. >> you know why? >> it was a favor for truman. that is where truman was from. >> let's get a slice of that speech. >> an iron curtain has descended across the continent. behind that line, like all the capitals of the ancient states of central and eastern europe -- berlin, prague, vienna, budapest, belgrade, bucharest. all of these famous cities and the population around them lying in rubble -- lie under the soviet sphere. >> why did you want to talk about this? >> i was inspired in my first book, and while this is in no way a sequel it represents thoughts i had. one thing i got interested in is the
as the chair of stark community bank in connecticut with a lecture at yale. from 2006 until 2008 he served as ceo of pay rent, alternative credit bureau, to demonstrate their credit worthiness using their rental and bill repayment history. welcome and thanks for your public service. >> members of the subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to testify today on the consumer credit reporting industry. credit reporting plays a critical role in consumer financial lives. it can determine their eligibility for credit cards, car loans, home mortgage loans. they also affect how much consumers pay for their loans. the industry is critical and contrary economy. it permits access to credit that consumers can afford to repay without credit reporting, many consumers would not be able to get credit at all. credit reports are often used in a number of non credit positions about consumers. it can be used to determine whether the consumer is offered a job. a car or homeowner insurance, a rental housing. the cftb is the first federal government agency that supervises both consumer reporting companies and
jersey and connecticut, they have had a very damaging blow. we need to act on that. the way we can meet the immediate need. it is part of the math. we will have to consider all the expenditures that we make, we'll have to make that part of the agreement. whatever dollars that we expand will have to be accounted for and will have to be paid for over a longer time. it severely and adversely affected damage, we need to make that expenditure now and we need to pay for that over the longer term. for my of standpoint, part of dealt with. >> i have taken home in good faith of what we know about the speaker's remarks as it relates to this catastrophe. i don't think anybody wants to see them in royal in politics. -- wants to see this -- see them embroiled in politics in washington. this is a disaster. in rockaway,they are still without power. we are going on six weeks now. in many parts of the city in the region, we're really pushing back the decades and it is hard been there. i think the speaker is sensitive to that, the remarks are very positive that we need to address the needs of the people.
. you cannot do that. 8:00 eastern on c-span 2. >> president obama spoke at a service in connecticut. the remarks are about 15 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. thank you, governor. to all the families, first responders, the community, clergy, guests. >> scripture tells to not lose heart. inwardly, we are being renewed day by day. momentary troubles are achieving as a further blow with a further glory that far outweighs the moment. we fix our eyes not on what is seen but on what is not seen. what is seen as temporary but what is not seen is eternal. for we know the earthly tents we live in are destroyed and then we have a building with god, and internal house in heaven, not built by human hands. we gather here in memory of 20 beautiful children and six remarkable adults. they lost their lives in a school that could have been any school in a quiet town full of good and decent people. it could be any town in america. if you are a new town, i come to offer the love and prayers of a nation. i am very mindful that mere words cannot match the deaths of your sorrow, nor can they
changed as well. it's my understanding the state of connecticut had the type of gun laws that have been proposed and they didn't work. at the end of the day it's an individual person, it's a people problem. and changing laws doesn't necessarily change hearts. it is a cultural problem as well. that's why i don't think we need to change these laws but we need to look at an issue of society where violence has become acceptable in many avenues and simply need to turn on the television many nights to see that. the first question was about the top 2% and class warfare and what is going on. but clearly 70% of americans take more from washington than they give. here we are as republicans upsets me that with the vote today and with the offer of speaker john boehner we've given into what the president has agreed. we have to go after the so-called rich. but as i indicated earlier, 41% of small business income is going to be taxed at a higher rate. and so this is just not the warren buffetts of the world. this is actually entrepreneurs that are actually paying income taxes on -- it stays in their b
that's what we need for the country to move ahead. host: steven an independent in connecticut. good morning to you. caller: good morning, thanks for taking my call. i really like hillary clinton, i think she's a hard worker, i think her old man is a hard worker too and whitewater was like three wars ago. it's a long time ago. but i'd like to see jeb bush also run against hillary clinton. i think those are two no nonsense personalities that can move our nation forward. thanks. host: so hey, steven, if jeb bush, if it's a bush-clinton race, for whom would you vote? caller: oh, gosh. i would lean toward jeb at this point because he has been really pushing education and education is one of my things. so right now he's got me. host: that's stephen, independent. who did you vote for in 2008? i mean in 2012. it's 2012 now. caller: i voted for president obama and i really, really liked mitt romney. i thought he had a great personality but you know, why do i got to pay less taxes than my friend from massachusetts? so that really bugged me. host: stephen an independent in connecticut. tyrone
, connecticut, many wonder what do they have in common? gun tragedy, the loss of 26 lives, and americans suffering from a devastating storm, certainly our hearts goes out to those babies who were lost. but it really speaks to americans in need, and i guess that's why i'm so troubled to be on the floor today, because the framework that we have says to america that when you're in need we will not as this congress and this government be prepared to help you. i think what is disappointing and i know for the speaker, it is probably the same case as i am speaking because just about three days ago we thought there was a deal between the white house and the framework that was offered and the leadership of this house. it's disappointing that in the course of a couple days we've come to a situation where this plan, plan b, raises only about $300 billion from high-income households and the centers for budget priorities suggest that millionaires will get $108,500 per $1 million, over $1 million in tax cuts, but what will the middle class gets? plan b allows the old pre-bush or bush tax cuts to conti
and work at these nonprofits. it is an economic generator in this town. host: jim from connecticut, republican line. caller: i have two questions. first, if there is no agreement by the december 31st deadline, can the congress act in such a way that any change in the law would be retroactive to january 1, 2013? do you believe the congress will consider solving for the individual taxpayer instead of the lobbyists? how do we get that turned around? guest: my answer to the upper question now, whether or not they can retroactively take on some of these issues so they do not pass it they can go on in postdate, that is something that have done quite often in terms of tax extensions in different bills where they will pass in february but it will be effective until january. host: industries benefiting most from this issue in terms of lobbying against sequestration in this issue of the fiscal cliff. education, health care, civil service and public officials. our last call joining us from buffalo, new york, good morning. caller: are you there? host: please, go ahead. caller: i am 21 years ol
us on the democratic line from connecticut. caller: good morning. my question is, in watching c- span over the years, i noticed there was once an episode where an economist talked-about a world view on reducing the imprint of the military and using limited black ops and to intervene in situations to quell unrest in the discos along with the things like the economy -- this goes along with things like the economy. my question is how do you see us going black ops and the cia? is this not what we did in afghanistan? guest: i understand there is a very wrong perception among the public that all special ops do are black ops and unilateral raids in the dead of night. that perception is widely held. in the case of columbia, the philippines, yemen, these other places that i am talking about, the governments have invited special operations forces in to help them, to help their country's forces. that is why i think it is such an effective use in the long term. it does not cause the same political diplomatic controversy as many people know what happened after the bin laden rate. it was a huge rup
mean connecticut, of course. [laughter] thank you so much. i will thank you more formally in a few minutes. this is really a wonderful time to pick your brains and talk with you. let me start with you, senator lieberman. when you came to congress, the united states was engaged in a cold war against totalitarian regimes, movement, and ideologies. as you leave the senate, the united states is engaged in an asymmetrical war against egalitarian -- egalitarian regimes. have we made any progress? >> we have made progress. i was about to quote lenin, sometimes it is to step foot forward, one step back. it strikes me that obviously there was enormous progress when the berlin wall went down. sadly, in russia itself, we have not really seen that returned. not quite as bad as the old stalinist days, but bad. i said to one of my colleagues that there are days it will be shot, and recent times when i left the senate wondering if i had ever done anything that would matter during that day. i think we have done something significant. this is history, the victory over communism in the soviet union
as a -- after the tragedy in connecticut. and it costs money to get the facilities hardened, to get the personnel that are needed. so i -- ambassador stevens was a proud californian. there's a hole in all of our hearts. i'm going to get to my questions. um, and i guess aisle going to ask it straight out. do you plan in the next budget to request the funding levels that are necessary for protecting all of our facilities? >> um, the answer to that is, yes, senator. i am, i am, although, aware -- as we all are -- in the con statements in which we are living. to remind the committee, as you all are well aware, for everything we do at the state department, and that includes protecting over 275 locations around the world, for all of the assistance we provide including assistance to israel, all of our programs including pep far, everything we do at the state department, as secretary clinton has articulated many times, is less than 1% of our federal budget -- >> so my question is, are you going the submit to us a plan and the money request that you believe you need absolutely paying attenti
, the gentleman from connecticut, longstanding authority on the subject of election reform in terms of the role of money in campaigns -- honoring the vows of our founders for a government of the many, not the government of the money and a person who has commanded the respect of our colleagues, has worked with aggressive organizations, brings real authority to the stuff, congressman john larson, chair of our taskforce. >> thank you, madam leader, and i thank you for the opportunity to serve our caucus in an area that is critical to all americans. we are just through major presidential and congressional elections. it is clear from listening to our colleagues and from listening to the people out there in this country that it is long overdue that we refer to as d.a.r.e., which, disclose, amend, reform, enforce, empower, and have reform for election in a way that will make sure that every american has access to the polls and that anyone who seeks to run for public office has the ability and financing to do so and that we can limit the amount of money that has so overshadowed our process. to those en
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)